The End of Politics

The End of Politics.

It is with some reluctance that I write words that we do not want to hear: our democracy is dead, and the two major political parties work for economic forces that they cannot control. Criticizing the Democrats for forsaking their constituents is now a waste of time, and the Republicans march virtually in lock-step behind a leadership which we do not see. Our trips to place our ballots, voting for effective political representation, is something like a ceremony begging the rain-gods to bring us rain. Upon the clouds promising rain are the faces of our politicians, drawn by our imaginations, working from materials provided us by the political presentation industry.

Aral Balkan: We didn’t lose control – it was stolen

We didn’t lose control – it was stolen  Aral Balkan,  https://ar.al/notes/we-didnt-lose-control-it-was-stolen/

Demise of the Democratic Party

Demise of the Democratic Party

Despite overwhelming evidence that deep reform is needed, the Democrats have continued down a self-defeating path. Regarding their internal politics, they have doubled-down upon their investment in failure by unanimously electing Wall Street-connected Chuck Schumer as Senate minority leader, together with approving the fabulously compromised Nancy Pelosi as Minority Leader of the House of Representatives. Then, to decorate the decomposing cake, they went on to install the Wall Street/Clinton/Obama sycophant Tom Perez over the grassroots-favored Keith Ellison as Chair of the Democratic National Committee.

Freedom From Microsoft v1.01

Freedom From Microsoft v1.01

It seems that with each passing year, corporations design more and more to take the common customer as a resource to be exploited - “owned” even. Why would I say this? As a direct analogy let's take a look at our Personal Computer – the PC – and its software.
 
The “Personal Computer” - the very name describes an object that is an extension of ourselves. The myth is that our PC functions to empower us - with memory, processing power, personal and social communication. The PC was idolized even before the Internet; but with the coming of the Internet, ownership of a PC became immensely popular, and even necessary. Microsoft rapidly accrued an immense fortune furthering the networked development of the newly popular PC. But even then there were signs that something was wrong.
 
Not long before the advent of the PC there was another, less-noted revolution – the revolution of the Minicomputer (“mini” as relative to the “mainframe”). Minicomputers offered affordable computer power to small organizations - academic institutions, research facilities, laboratories, development teams, small and large businesses, all took advantage of the new machine. System manufacturing firms such as DEC, SUN, PRIME prospered. And one thing the minicomputer offered was community – a minicomputer was a shared resource for multiple users. And most of the software that was available at that time was offered as program source code (text), as well as pre-compiled. It was in just such a community that Richard M. Stallman – RMS came into his own.
 
RMS, and many others like him, developed software to be shared on the Minicomputer. It is true that Richard inhabited something of an ivory tower, MIT to be exact, but MIT was really just a leading-edge example of the kind of computing that was being done in many places at the time. Anyway, a day came when RMS needed to be able to modify some of the driving software for a new printer attached to the lab minicomputer, in order to communicate messages of printer-jams to other users. To his amazement and utter frustration, Richard found that the program source code to the printer software was strictly NOT available, and he was unable to address the lab's problem.

 

Vote Your Preference

Vote Your Preference

The Yes/No vote is a very poor answer to our desire for democratic selection of leadership. Anyone who seriously considers their vote between candidates in an election soon finds themselves in a quandry: Should I vote for the candidate who seems to hold the same beliefs and values as I do - or should I vote for the candidate who could bring more jobs and prosperity to the region? One candidate may be very desirable because of his/her concern about global warming – while at the same time undesirable because they have previously received campaign donations from ExxonMobil – and yet again very desirable because of their stand on race and gender issues - while the opposing candidate may possess yet another conglomeration of desirable and less desirable attributes. The list of factors to consider goes on and on. But your vote is only a simple Yes/No!

Tweet